Pedro Torres talks how Ego is one of the common problems that can cause teams to self destroy

Ego is one of the common problems that can cause teams to self destroy. If team dynamics are not well handled it´s quite easy to see brilliant developers becoming “prima-donas”; they feel they are like a god on the earth. At the end, it does not matter who does the work, what matters is a team´s outcome. When there are such “divas” on the team they feel that everyone should be thankful for having them on the team.

About Pedro Gustavo Torres

Pedro Gustavo Torres is an Agile Coach @ SONAE, in Porto, Portugal.
He started his agile quest in 2010. He’s a seasoned Scrum Master, Agile Coach and Trainer. He also has experience acting as a Scrum Product Owner. He’s passionate about scrum, agile and all the practices that can help teams deliver early value to their customers. He is also quite techie and a gadgets fan. You can find him in linkedin. He writes his learning’s on his blog. His twitter: @_pedro_torres

Pedro Torres talks how most of his learning’s came from failures

Pedro explains us how he learned more with failures than with success. In his opinion, a good Scrum Master must have the ability to deal with failure well, because failure is the only road for learning. He believes that failure is so important the he would rather hire someone that has gone through several failures and learned several lessons than someone that was always successful. In his opinion, people that are always successful learn as much as the ones that fail often and have the ability to learn from their mistakes.

About Pedro Gustavo Torres

Pedro Gustavo Torres is an Agile Coach @ SONAE, in Porto, Portugal.
He started his agile quest in 2010. He’s a seasoned Scrum Master, Agile Coach and Trainer. He also has experience acting as a Scrum Product Owner. He’s passionate about scrum, agile and all the practices that can help teams deliver early value to their customers. He is also quite techie and a gadgets fan. You can find him in linkedin. He writes his learning’s on his blog. His twitter: @_pedro_torres

Ryan Ripley talks about the delusion of control

The transition from Project Manager to Scrum Master is never an easy one. Ryan describes his own journey and how he overcame his own delusion of control. During this episode we also introduced the book The 5 Dysfunctions of a Team by Lencioni.

About Ryan Ripley

Ryan Ripley loves helping people do great work. He is a servant leader at heart and is passionate about fostering safety and trust in the workplace. Ryan created the Agile for Humans podcast to put the focus back on the individuals and interactions that make agile work.
You can link up with Ryan Ripley on LinkedIn and connect with Ryan Ripley on Twitter.
Ryan also hosts a popular Agile podcast: Agile for Humans. Be sure to check it out!

Jeff Campbell shares 2 transformative lessons he learned in the same company

There are many learnings we collect along our journey as Scrum Masters. However, transformative lessons are not that common, except for Jeff in this particular job. Listen how he learned 2 lessons that totally changed how he looks at his job as a Scrum Master.

About Jeff Campbell

Jeff is an Agile Coach who considers the discovery of Agile and Lean to be one of the most defining moments of his life, and considers helping others to improve their working life not to simply be a job, but a social responsibility. As an Agile Coach, he has worked with driving Agile transformations in organisations both small and large. He is one of the founding members of www.scrumbeers.com and an organiser of www.brewingagile.org in his spare time. He is also the author of an open source book called Actionable Agile Tools, where he explains how he uses 15 of the tools he uses in his daily work as a scrum master and agile coach.
You can link with Jeff Campbell on LinkedIn, and connect with Jeff Campbell on Twitter.

Natalie Warnert explains why Scrum Masters must have partners in the organization

When we start working in a new organization we must face a new environment, new people, and must therefore start building our support network. Natalie suggests you seek out a partner in the new organization that can support your work. We also discuss why the role of leadership is so critical for the success of the team.

About Natalie Warnert

As a developer turned Agile coach, Natalie Warnert understands and embraces what it takes to build great products. Natalie focuses teams on embracing Agile values to build the right product and build the product right. Natalie is currently coaching the Cart/Checkout teams for Best Buy Dotcom and recently earned her Master of Arts degree in Organizational Leadership and Strategic Management.
You can link with Natalie Warnert on LinkedIn, connect with Natalie Warnert on Twitter, read her blog at nataliewarnert.com, and visit her project page Women in Agile.

Anton Zotin on why it is critical to understand everyone has their own journey to Agile

As Scrum Masters we are often very passionate about what is the “right way”, we see a lot of problems immediately, and we know how to fix them. Anton shares the story of such a moment in his career and how he started to accept that “everyone has their own journey”. His recipe is:

  1. Gradually lead the time in the right direction. Don’t try to change everything at the same time.
  2. Whatever you think is going wrong, reflect that back to the team and help them find their own solution. Be an Agile Mirror!

In this Episode we mention 2 important books:
The Human Side of the Enterprise by McGregor, the classic that introduced the Theory X and Theory Y model, which we discuss in this episode.
Turn the Ship Around by Marquee, a book on leadership that presents a model that is very useful for Scrum Masters.

About Anton Zotin

Anton is an Agile guy born in cold Siberia but with hot and passionate heart. He has worked in all sorts of companies and environments, and has been an agile fan since 2004. Nowadays works and lives in Berlin. And he deeply believes in people.
You can connect with Anton Zotin on LinkedIn, or find Anton Zotin on twitter. You can also ask him questions over email.

Ben Linders explains that Agile is not a process, and why that matters

Agile is not a process, and that is an important realization that all teams should reach at some point. But how to get them to that realization? How to help team members understand that Agile is not a set of recipes that you follow blindly?

About About Ben Linders

Ben Linders is an Independent Consultant in Agile, Lean, Quality and Continuous Improvement, based in The Netherlands. Author of Getting Value out of Agile Retrospectives, Waardevolle Agile Retrospectives & What Drives Quality.
You can follow Ben Linders on Twitter, and connect with Ben Linders on LinkedIn.

You can find Ben’s Agile self-assessment in his web-site, and find more about his work and upcoming workshops.