Gil Zilberfeld advises: as a Scrum Master check your Ego at the door

Working as a Scrum Master requires a healthy dose of humility, and this is what Gil learned in this story. This lead to him learning about the importance of gaining trust, and also how to do it! He shares with us some practices on how to gain trust in teams that have a hard time trusting.

About Gil Zilberfeld

For over 20 years, Gil has developed, tested, managed and designed software products. He’s gone through failures and successes, in different types of projects and companies.
He has trained and coached developers how to write tests for their untestable code. He has worked with testers on complex applications and with very tight deadlines. He’s helped release products that fit customer needs, by testing the waters, and getting their feedback integrated. He has implemented agile, kanban and lean principles and adapted them to fit teams better.
You can link up with Gil Zilberfeld on LinkedIn, or find Gil Zilberfeld on Twitter.
Gil is writing a book on Unit Testing. Check it out.

Matthias Seul on why metrics and the questions we ask are our best friends

When trying to understand the system that affects our performance we can’t stay at the surface level. We need to dig deeper to find the real causes for performance problems. Matthias suggest that we measure our system to find what questions we should ask, and then ask “Why?” to help us understand that system.

About Matthias Seul

Matthias worked 10+ years as software developer and gravitated towards coaching in recent years. He is a tech enthusiast, board gamer, inventor and wild duck. Matthias believes in intrinsic motivation – thus he believes in Agile. He says that “together we can make projects a more fulfilling and successful work environment for all involved”.
You can link up with Matthias Seul on LinkedIn, and reach Matthias Seul on twitter. Matthias is interested in your questions and feedback, and you can reach him via email as well.

Matthias Seul on being a Scrum Master

What does it mean to be a Scrum Master? Have you asked yourself that question? Matthias explains how he came to realize that being a Scrum Master is much more than knowing the process and helping teams grow as teams. It is especially about yourself. Listen to what Matthias considers one of the key skills for Scrum Masters.

About Matthias Seul

Matthias worked 10+ years as software developer and gravitated towards coaching in recent years. He is a tech enthusiast, board gamer, inventor and wild duck. Matthias believes in intrinsic motivation – thus he believes in Agile. He says that “together we can make projects a more fulfilling and successful work environment for all involved”.
You can link up with Matthias Seul on LinkedIn, and reach Matthias Seul on twitter. Matthias is interested in your questions and feedback, and you can reach him via email as well.

Emilia Breton-Lake on the importance of conversations for successful scrum masters

How do you measure your success as a Scrum Master? Emilia shares her definition of success, and her main tasks in the search for that successful outcome. The tool that she uses the most is 1-on-1 conversations that help her focus on the right topics and discover possible blockers. As she puts it: “whenever you have a question: ask the team!”.

About Emilia Breton-Lake

Emilia is a natural-born Agile thinker who managed to swim out of the PMI waterfall almost a decade ago. As the head of the PMO at a major non profit she is constantly looking for new ways to build better software and make the world a better place.
She has also been working on 2 major innovations, On going retrospectives, and #NoNumbers where they have eliminated sizing of stories. They still groom and plan, but don’t assign sizes to stories.
Emilia has worked hard to introduce Scrum and Agile to a non-profit that is very resistant to change.
You can link up with Emilia Breton-Lake on LinkedIn. Or follow Emilia Breton-Lake’s articles at the Scrum Alliance website.

Luis Gonçalves on how to help a team find their purpose

Purpose is one of the key motivators according to the classic “Drive” by Dan Pink. Luis shares with us how he works with teams to help them find their purpose and improve their performance as a team. Luis explains the main steps of a workshop that he uses to help teams get started, or re-started on the path to high-performance.

About Luis Gonçalves

Luis Gonçalves is a Co-Founder of Oikosofy, the Co-Author of the book “Getting Value out Agile Retrospectives”, a book which I use regularly to get inspired to organize innovative retrospectives. Luis is also an International Speaker and prolific Blogger. I don’t know where he gets the time to do all of this 🙂
Luis’ passion lies on the Management side of software development where he tries to apply what he has learned from the Management 3.0 books.
He is also a co-founder of a MeetUp group in Munich, Germany called High Performing Teams. A meetup he created to “Define the future of Management and Leadership”.
You can link up with Luis Gonçalves on LinkedIn, and connect with Luis Gonçalves on Twitter.

In case you are interested in Agile Retrospectives we are at the moment preparing a 10 DAYS FREE AGILE RETROSPECTIVES PROGRAM. This is a complete self-study program where you will learn anything that you need to become a great Agile Retrospectives facilitator.

Luis Gonçalves on how threats destroy teams

Threats are sometimes used by Theory X managers that believe they are helping them succeed with those threats. However, that was not the case in this particular case, where threats led to a very low level of trust and self-confidence that ultimately destroyed the team.

In this episode we mention a team assessment checklist by Luis Goncalves based on the book the book: The five Dysfunctions of a Team that can be used by Scrum Masters or by the team for self-assessment. This checklist was based on the book by Patrick Lencioni, The five dysfunctions of a team.

About Luis Gonçalves

Luis Gonçalves is a Co-Founder of Oikosofy, the Co-Author of the book “Getting Value out Agile Retrospectives”, a book which I use regularly to get inspired to organize innovative retrospectives. Luis is also an International Speaker and prolific Blogger. I don’t know where he gets the time to do all of this 🙂
Luis’ passion lies on the Management side of software development where he tries to apply what he has learned from the Management 3.0 books.
He is also a co-founder of a MeetUp group in Munich, Germany called High Performing Teams. A meetup he created to “Define the future of Management and Leadership”.
You can link up with Luis Gonçalves on LinkedIn, and connect with Luis Gonçalves on Twitter.

In case you are interested in Agile Retrospectives we are at the moment preparing a 10 DAYS FREE AGILE RETROSPECTIVES PROGRAM. This is a complete self-study program where you will learn anything that you need to become a great Agile Retrospectives facilitator.

Alexandre Cuva on Multitasking and other serious problems that affect teams

We all know how multitasking can be the killer of effectiveness. Teams can easily lose their focus and be unable to deliver. What to do about that? And what are the consequences of that lack of focus? We discuss the article by Johanna Rothman about why managers like overwork, and the importance of continuous and short term feedback for the teams.

About Alexandre Cuva

Former International Agile Coach, now CEO in charge of SmartDev an outsourcing company in Vietnam. In SmartDev Alexandre applies XP Programming practices within Agile/Lean Management. He has been worked with pragmatic, agile, lean, big, organic and team oriented organizations. Based upon his experiences, he understands that agile is a big experiment and in some peoples mind still is an unproven hypothesis.
He co-founded diverse agile communities in Switzerland like ScrumBeer, Stoos Satellite and now he is the co-founder of the Agile Community in Da Nang.
You can link up with Alexandre Cuva on LinkedIn, and find Alexandre Cuva on Twitter.

Alexandre Cuva explains how a self organizing team is the measure of success for a Scrum Master

Alexandre tells us a story of a team that quickly got to a point where they could lead themselves with very little support from Alexandre, their Scrum Master. How can the teams get there? And what does that mean for the Scrum Master? We discuss the conditions necessary for the teams to self-organize, and how Scrum Masters can take those into account.

About Alexandre Cuva

Former International Agile Coach, now CEO in charge of SmartDev an outsourcing company in Vietnam. In SmartDev Alexandre applies XP Programming practices within Agile/Lean Management. He has been worked with pragmatic, agile, lean, big, organic and team oriented organizations. Based upon his experiences, he understands that agile is a big experiment and in some peoples mind still is an unproven hypothesis.
He co-founded diverse agile communities in Switzerland like ScrumBeer, Stoos Satellite and now he is the co-founder of the Agile Community in Da Nang.
You can link up with Alexandre Cuva on LinkedIn, and find Alexandre Cuva on Twitter.

Ben Linders explains that Agile is not a process, and why that matters

Agile is not a process, and that is an important realization that all teams should reach at some point. But how to get them to that realization? How to help team members understand that Agile is not a set of recipes that you follow blindly?

About About Ben Linders

Ben Linders is an Independent Consultant in Agile, Lean, Quality and Continuous Improvement, based in The Netherlands. Author of Getting Value out of Agile Retrospectives, Waardevolle Agile Retrospectives & What Drives Quality.
You can follow Ben Linders on Twitter, and connect with Ben Linders on LinkedIn.

You can find Ben’s Agile self-assessment in his web-site, and find more about his work and upcoming workshops.

Francesco Attanasio describes the A3 thinking approach to problem solving

Problem solving is a skill that both team and Scrum Master must be proficient at. In this episode Francesco describes A3 thinking (article by Francesco on A3 problem solving), one of the tools that we can use to solve problems with the teams. He also mentions the A3 Thinker action deck, a product by Claudio Perrone, that is designed to help ask the right questions when investigating problems. For more on A3 Thinking read also Toyota Way by Jeffrey Liker and Learning to See by the Lean Institute.

About Francesco Attanasio

Stefano Porro Scrum Master toolbox podcastFrancesco Attanasio is an Agile practitioner, Certified Scrum Professional® (CSP) and Certified ScrumMaster® (CSM), Developer, Trainer, Reader, Dreamer and Runner.
He’s now been working as Scrum Master for more than 3 years. Having worked so far as Scrum Developer and Scrum Master in several teams, Francesco has fieldwork experience of how Scrum can be implemented with success. He provides Lean/Agile/Scrum training and coaching to Product Owners, Scrum Masters and Development Teams.
You can find Francesco Attanasio on twitter. You can also find Francesco Attanasio on LinkedIn, and in the Scrum Alliance website.