Andrew Hudson on the importance of surfacing and tackling conflict before it is too late

Andrew introduces the Scrum Values and how many team-related anti-patterns come from not following those values. We also discuss the importance of enabling and helping surface difficult conversations before it is too late, and things turn sour.

In this episode, we refer to the interview with Karin Tenelius on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast.

Featured Book of the Week: Drive by Daniel Pink

The book Drive by Daniel Pink reminds us that what drives human behavior is not exactly what we expect. Rewarding has an impact, but that impact is limited, and the rewards matter. Daniel Pink explores the sources of motivation and engagement in this book. Purpose, Autonomy and Mastery come out as the most important aspects we must attend to as Scrum Masters.

About Andrew Hudson

Andy is a Scrum Master within the Media industry. He’s passionate about making work a motivating, enjoyable and empowering place to be. He wants to help teams and individuals reach their full potential and believes developing the right vision and mindset is more valuable to effective teams than any process or framework.

You can link with Andrew Hudson on LinkedIn and connect with Andrew Hudson on Twitter.

Gilberto Urueta and the case of the teammate that was always late

In this episode we tackle the problem of the teammate that was always late, and how trying to talk about the problem made the situation even worse. We often tend to talk about problems, but sometimes that’s the worst possible solution. Listen in to learn about one of those stories, and hear how Gilberto and the team turned the situation around, avoiding losing a team member that needed their support.

Featured Book of the Week: Por Un Scrum Popular by Tobias Mayer and Alan Cyment

In “Por Un Scrum Popular” (a translated adaptation of Tobias Mayer’s The People’s Scrum), Gilberto found a description of Scrum that he could get excited about. A more approachable version of Scrum that fit well his view of how Scrum could help teams.

About Gilberto Urueta

Gilberto is a Berlin-based Scrum Master. He is passionate about Agile, Lean, Scrum and most of all complexity. He is currently working at Takeaway, a leading online food delivery marketplace in Continental Europe.

You can link with Gilberto Urueta on LinkedIn and connect with Gilberto Urueta on Twitter.

Zeshan Ilyas on the move from hard estimates to Story Points in Release Planning

Planning is not the ultimate solution to problems we face. Agilists know this to be true, and it is even one of the values in the Agile Manifesto: Responding to Change Over Following A Plan.

But planning is still necessary, and a critical part of how teams and organisations work. As Scrum Masters, the planning discipline is one of the key aspects we should focus on. In this episode we talk about one possible evolution of planning for our teams. From hard estimates, to Story Points.

Featured Book of the Week: Coaching Agile Teams by Lyssa Adkins

The coaching stance and the ability to help team members progress in their own learning journey is critical for us, Scrum Masters. In Coaching Agile Teams, Lyssa Adkins describes and teaches us about Coaching as an approach to help teams, and how that affects our Scrum Master role.

About Zeshan Ilyas

With a firm focus on Agile and Scrum methodologies, Zeshan has worked within high profile organisations, including the HSBC, Capgemini Financial Services, Talk, Talk, and many more.

Having worked with Agile companies for many years, Zeshan identified a need for a community of Agilists in Pakistan, which would bring together professionals adopting an Agile or Scrum approach, help increase awareness of Agile.

You can link with Zeshan Ilyas on LinkedIn and connect with Zeshan Ilyas on Twitter.

 

David Spinks: how to help a team get unstuck

When teams are stuck in their Agile adoption, it is tempting to bring in more training, do more teaching and expect that to solve the problem. In reality, however, the situation is much more complicated. We need to understand the real reasons for the team’s lack of progress, and adapt our approach to the reality we face. Training may be a good option, but it certainly isn’t the only one. In this episode we talk about a team that was stuck, not completing sprints, no tester in the team, etc. And we cover some practical tips on how to deal with similar situations.

Featured Book of the Week: Scrum Field Guide by Mitch Lacey

In the Scrum Field Guide, Mitch Lacey lays out advice for the Scrum practitioner’s first year. It is a practical advice-filled book that will help you face, and overcome the most common problems that Scrum Masters face in their first few months on the job.

About David Spinks

David has over 15 years experience in the IT industry. He began his career as a software developer before becoming a Scrum Master in 2012. He calls himself an ‘agile adventurer’ and believes in continuous learning in himself and others. His passion is getting the best out of teams and seeing people reach their full potential. He has worked in a variety of industries, including eCommerce, social housing and education.

You can link with David Spinks on LinkedIn and connect with David Spinks on Twitter.

Jem D’jelal on the leadership as command and control anti-pattern

When strong personalities are in positions of power, their ideas become “law”. But sometimes the leaders are themselves prisoners of their own approach to work. In this episode we discuss how we, as Scrum Masters, can help those leaders recognize the anti-patterns they create and overcome those obstacles to the performance of the team.

Featured Book for the Week: The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

In The Alchemist, Paulo Coelho tells the story of a pilgrimage and journey where the hero of the story goes through many challenges and is pushed to learn more about himself, and face the world without fear. This book was an inspiration for Jem when he was introducing the Scrum Master role to a new organization, and he was himself a new Scrum Master. Fear is part of the journey, and this book helped Jem accept and overcome that fact.

About Jem D’jelal

Jem trained to be a social worker, but ended up dropping out & joining the dark side instead : investment banking 🙂 In a funny way, Jem was led back to his passion – helping people. This happened when he was introduced to Scrum in 2006, and has been a career Scrum Master since. He calls himself “nomadic”, having had almost 30 roles in 10 + years. He does say that he will be searching for a home at some point. Some of Jem’s other passions involve running, a part time mentoring charity for repeating youth offenders in North London & callisthenics.

You can link with Jem D’Jelal on LinkedIn and connect with Jem D’Jelal on Twitter.

Victor Bonnacci asks: what are the values you follow?

Defining success is difficult enough, but when we forget the values that Agile and XP bring to the picture it becomes even harder. Victor invites us to start with the values that we are supposed to be following: the Scrum, XP and Agile values.

About Victor Bonnacci

Vic coaches software teams at Bio-Rad Laboratories using Scrum and XP practices. He’s worked in IT for twenty years; first as a webmaster, programmer, project manager and currently as a scrum master and coach. Vic lives in Southern California where he is very active in the local community, and he hosts the Agile Coffee podcast.
You can link with Victor Bonnacci on LinkedIn, and connect with Victor Bonnacci on Twitter.
Be sure to follow Victor Bonnacci’s podcast: Agile Coffee.

Victor Bonnacci on leading a multi-team, entereprise change process

There are many factors to take into account in a change process. When many teams are involved this becomes an even more important realization. Victor explains his experience with a large Entreprise change management process.

About Victor Bonnacci

Vic coaches software teams at Bio-Rad Laboratories using Scrum and XP practices. He’s worked in IT for twenty years; first as a webmaster, programmer, project manager and currently as a scrum master and coach. Vic lives in Southern California where he is very active in the local community, and he hosts the Agile Coffee podcast.
You can link with Victor Bonnacci on LinkedIn, and connect with Victor Bonnacci on Twitter.
Be sure to follow Victor Bonnacci’s podcast: Agile Coffee.

Victor Bonnacci explains how each team is different from each other

Although it is tempting to “see” patterns in the teams we work with, the fact is that every team is different. Even the same team is different from project to project, and from day to today. Victor shares his journey from focusing on the process to focus on the team, and how important that is for all Scrum Masters.

About Victor Bonnacci

Vic coaches software teams at Bio-Rad Laboratories using Scrum and XP practices. He’s worked in IT for twenty years; first as a webmaster, programmer, project manager and currently as a scrum master and coach. Vic lives in Southern California where he is very active in the local community, and he hosts the Agile Coffee podcast.
You can link with Victor Bonnacci on LinkedIn, and connect with Victor Bonnacci on Twitter.
Be sure to follow Victor Bonnacci’s podcast: Agile Coffee.

Victor Bonnacci on the importance of letting the team solve their own problems

All of us who have a background in more directive roles (manager, project manager) from our time before Agile, are tempted to take over the problems and solve them for the team. However that’s not how we help teams grow. In this episode Victor shares his story of a recovering Project Manager that needs to learn to help the team solve their own problems.

About Victor Bonnacci

Vic coaches software teams at Bio-Rad Laboratories using Scrum and XP practices. He’s worked in IT for twenty years; first as a webmaster, programmer, project manager and currently as a scrum master and coach. Vic lives in Southern California where he is very active in the local community, and he hosts the Agile Coffee podcast.
You can link with Victor Bonnacci on LinkedIn, and connect with Victor Bonnacci on Twitter.
Be sure to follow Victor Bonnacci’s podcast: Agile Coffee.

Ruben Sadoyan on the nasty impact of stress and pressure

The two horsemen of the team’s apocalypse are stress and pressure. Sure, sometimes a little pressure can give us focus, but at what expense. In this story Ruben explains the possible impact that too much pressure can have on the team.

About Ruben Sadoyan

Ruben has played many different roles in his career. Agile Coach, Team Engineer, Scrum Master with IT Project Management and Software Development background are just some of those. He’s also been an Account executive with software/web development roots and business development, experienced in team and client relationship management.
He’s also launched a startup named Internet Company and has more than 15 years experience in IT. He describes himself as Focused on constant improvement and self-education. Result driven, able to lead in a Lean way, identify root causes and gradually improve teams to make results happen.