Tim Bourguignon follows the pain to understand how the system works

Follow the pain to understand the system. Look for unexplained trends, then look outside the team for possible explanations. Find out who is actually communicating with whom. Measure everything you can to detect changes, or impacts from others outside the system. Then sit back and see the big picture.

About Tim Bourguignon

Tim likes to describe himself as a full time geek, agile developer and BS hunter. He was born in France, raised as a European child and currently lives in Germany where he juggles with software development and Scrum Mastering. When he’s not in front of a computer, you’ll find him behind a camera, in his running shoes or with his wife & son… of course never in that order!
You can connect with Tim Bourguignon on twitter or visit Tim Bourguignon’s website to see what he is up to.

Tim Bourguignon tells the story of the battles a change team goes through

Tim’s story is about a team that is changing an organization. He discusses how believing you can, and wanting to improve the world can sometimes lead you down the wrong road. And he suggests a few rules to take into account if you want to survive the change process as a team.

About Tim Bourguignon

Tim likes to describe himself as a full time geek, agile developer and BS hunter. He was born in France, raised as a European child and currently lives in Germany where he juggles with software development and Scrum Mastering. When he’s not in front of a computer, you’ll find him behind a camera, in his running shoes or with his wife & son… of course never in that order!
You can connect with Tim Bourguignon on twitter or visit Tim Bourguignon’s website to see what he is up to.

Jeremy Jarrell on how Scrum is a method to understand how the system behaves

To understand how the system behaves we must “poke” it, and Scrum is just the perfect method for that. Every sprint is an experiment that helps the team and the Scrum Master understand how the system behaves and reacts to the different experiments that we run every sprint. Jeremy has a collection of metrics he follows-up regularly to keep in aware of how the system behaves, and enable him to actual test new approaches every sprint.

About Jeremy Jarrell

Jeremy Jarrell is an agile coach and author who helps teams get better at doing what they love. He is heavily involved in the technology community, both as a highly rated speaker as well as a syndicated author whose articles and videos have appeared on numerous popular websites.
You can connect with Jeremy Jarrell on twitter, and link with Jeremy Jarrell on LinkedIn. Jeremy’s web-site is at www.jeremyjarrell.com.
Jeremy’s latest video course, Agile Release Planning, is available now from FrontRowAgile.com.

Wayde Stallmann on the touchy feely system conditions that affect your team

Wayde has worked with many teams, and in this episode he describes the aspects of the system conditions that affect team’s performance. Those system conditions are not the ones you would expect to hear about. The fact is that we work with people, and people make up the system we are part of, in the end it is all much more touchy feely than we would like to accept.

About Wayde Stallmann

Wayde is an Agile coach with TeamFirstDevelopment.com. He is interested in helping teams improve using the same techniques that Improv theater teams use to develop Great Team Players.
You can connect with Wayde Stallmann on twitter, or link with Wayde Stallmann on LinkedIn. Or email Wayde Stallmann at wayde@wayde.com.

Steve Holyer gives you 5 tools that you can use to assess the System

The 5 tools that you can use to assess the system are:

  1. Agile Fluency model: a model to assess the development of the teams you work with. To know more, check out AgileFluencyImmersion.com, a workshop that helps you and your teams learn how to achieve better results.
  2. Strategy Maps: A diagram that creates clarity on what are the defined, but also real goals for an organization.
  3. Design your coaching alliance: A method to help you, as a Scrum Master, understand what are the goals for your work with the teams, and to anchor your work on a clear vision and outcome.
  4. Impact Mapping: a method to help you discover and understand what are the high-value work items (User Stories or Features) for your teams to work on. This tool alone will have a great impact on your work with Product Owners.
  5. Value Stream Mapping: A way to analyse how the work is completed in an organization. Following the work from start to completion and creating a Value Stream Map of that work will give you insights into what are the impediments to value creation in your organization.

About Steve Hoyler

Steve Holyer serves as advocate, trainer and mentor for companies looking for a better ways of working, using Agile practices in a productive, fulfilling, and fun way.
He learned his craft serving as a Scrum Master with multiple teams and organisations, so he knows how to change an organisation from the inside. Steve now serves as an indie-label Agile Coach-for-Hire. He’s passion lies with coaching managers and teams to find ways to do software better.
You can contact Steve Hoyler on twitter, and find Steve Hoyler on LinkedIn. For more, check his Lift Off workshop.

Stefano Porro explains his view of Complexity in software development

Software development is not the same as building a road, or building a house. There’s a key concept called Complexity that explains why many of our assumptions of how software development happens are false. Stefano explains his views of how we can understand the performance of the team in the context of the performance of the whole organization and what to do about it.

In this episode, Stefano refers to Polarity Management, a way of looking at the role of management that can significantly increase the performance of the organization. For more, read this page on Polarity Management.

About Stefano Porro

Stefano Porro Scrum Master toolbox podcastStefano is from Turin, Italy. He has worked since 2001 in IT projects and he feels lucky because he does what he loves. He learned about Scrum in 2007 when the company where he was working decided to adopt Scrum. For the first two years he was part of a Scrum team, and he was fascinated from the role of the Scrum Master because he always loved to help team’s members. For him, becoming a Scrum Master, was a natural evolution.

You can find Stefano Porro on Twitter, and connect with Stefano Porro on Linkedin.

Stefano would also like you to be in touch with him through gmail (stefano.porro81@gmail.com) or skype (stefano.bowen). mail: stefano.porro81@gmail.com

You can follow Stefano’s blog to know more about his work and his ideas.

Jon Eversett explains how to look at the system in a way that helps teams improve

Look at the system, understand what can be changed by simplifying the workflow. Jon explains how he is helping management act on the system by finding, and then resolving impediments that the teams face regularly.

About Jon Eversett

scrum_master_toolbox_podcast_Andy_Deighton Former Business Analyst, Product Owner wannabe, currently a Scrum Master. Jon works with teams with different maturity levels and some relatively new Product Owners. You can find Jon Eversett on LinkedIn, or interact with Jon Eversett on Twitter. You can read Jon Eversett’s blog to find out more about his ideas on the role of the scrum master and all things agile.

Antti Tevanlinna shares his tools to understand and change the system

Understand and change the system is perhaps one of the major challenges for Scrum Masters all over the world. In this episode Antti shares his favourite tools for that exact task:

  • Measure Lead Time, and how each action affects that metric. Use that metric to detect problems in how the system works at all times.
  • Create causal loop diagrams that help you understand what are the many effects, and causes in play within the organization.
    Both of the tools mentioned are part of an arsenal of tools that you can find when studying Systems Thinking. To get you started, Antti recommends the book The V Discipline by Peter Senge.

About Antti Tevanlinna

scrum_master_toolbox_podcast_Andy_Deighton Antti is an agile practitioner, who got started with agile in my own very first Agile project way back in 2004. He’s been through all kinds of roles, from team member, to management, to customer-facing roles.
You can connect with Antti Tevanlinna on twitter, and check Antti Tevanlinna’s blog.

Henrik Mårtensson introduces the Logical Thinking Process and Process Control Charts

Henrik Mårtensson introduces the Logical Thinking Process and Process Control Charts as tools that help you analyse the impact of the system in the performance of the teams. He also discusses how to define clearly what problem you are solving before getting started.

About Henrik Mårtensson

scrum_master_toolbox_podcast_Andy_Deighton If there is one word summing up Henrik Mårtensson, it is “curious”. Henrik is a systems thinker, strategy methodologist, process improvement consultant, project manager, author, and trick photographer. In 2014 he built a network organisation for photography and media production from scratch, to more than 200 people. He is kind to strangers, but has made friends dive off cliffs.
You can follow Henrik Mårtensson on Twitter and read Henrik Måretensson’s blog where he shares his ideas and breakthroughs in the field of Agile, Theory of Constraints and management in general.

Dominic Krimmer explains how to reveal the system to the system itself

If you are to help change it, you must reveal the system to the system itself. Dominic explains his approach to uncover the system conditions that block the team’s progress, as well as what he’s learned about how to create the right conditions for the teams to grow within their environment.

About Dominic Krimmer

scrum_master_toolbox_podcast_Andy_Deighton Dominic has worked as a Software Developer since 2001, being a Scrum Master since 2009. He has collected many cool experiences in agile methods in different companies like CHIP, Sixt, mydriver.com and HolidayCheck. And has a small Kanban implementation at a manufacturing site in Latin America is also under his belt! 🙂 You can connect with Dominic Krimmer on twitter and visit Dominic Krimmer’s blog.