BONUS: Allan Kelly and Vasco Duarte on #NoProjects and #NoEstimates the latest trends in the Agile community

This is an episode about #NoProjects, #NoEstimates and introduces a unique, and 1-time-only workshop by Allan and Vasco that will take place in August 21st, 2018 in Zurich, just before the ALE2018 Unconference. Check out this page about the #NoProjects and #NoEstimates Workshop to know more.

In the past few years a few new trends have emerged in the Agile community that have challenged some of the basic assumptions of how software should be delivered. The first one, #NoProjects is challenging the idea that software work is best managed as a project. As Allan puts it in this episode: “Successful software does not end. It continues. And projects are for temporary endeavours, that have a known start and fixed end. That’s now how software is developed today.”

With that start to the episode you can expect that many unconventional (and inconvenient?) ideas will be shared in this podcast focused on the latest trends in how to manage software development.

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BONUS: Mary and Tom Poppendieck on Lean Software Development, Business Agility and how autonomous teams enable adaptability

Tom and Mary Poppendieck have authored several books over the years about what needs to change in how we develop software to be able to meet the demands of the market, competition, and the growth in complexity of technology businesses. A recurring pattern they have witnessed is that people keep trying to discover a “silver bullet”. We explore why that is a bad idea and some of the changes in product development that make it an impossible quest.

Read on for the details, and all the links shared during the show.

Continue reading BONUS: Mary and Tom Poppendieck on Lean Software Development, Business Agility and how autonomous teams enable adaptability

Ricardo explains that if you do not have poising people in the team performance in his experience its always driven by the system.

By his experience every time a team was not performing the reasons were related with a poor system. Before we blame people we should look into how the organization is assembled.

About Ricardo Fiel

Ricardo has 12 years experience in software teams, He had multiple roles from developer to architect to CTO, working in both startups and global corporations. He led teams from 4 to 30 members. Currently, he leads product development (SaaS) teams at Rupeal. You can find Ricardo in linkedin or twitter.

Ricardo defines success of a Scrum Master as the capacity of helping the team to ship software fast and with quality

If a team is able to ship a product day after day, with increased quality and increased velocity this is a clear sign, at least for Ricardo that he is doing a good job as Scrum Master.

About Ricardo Fiel

Ricardo has 12 years experience in software teams, He had multiple roles from developer to architect to CTO, working in both startups and global corporations. He led teams from 4 to 30 members. Currently, he leads product development (SaaS) teams at Rupeal. You can find Ricardo in linkedin or twitter.

Ricardo Fiel explain us how important the job of Scrum Master is.

Ricardo tells us that a good Scrum Master is not the one that is there to solve all the problems but the one that help the team to solve their own problems. Being always there for the team will not help the team to become self organized.

About Ricardo Fiel

Ricardo has 12 years experience in software teams, He had multiple roles from developer to architect to CTO, working in both startups and global corporations. He led teams from 4 to 30 members. Currently, he leads product development (SaaS) teams at Rupeal. You can find Ricardo in linkedin or twitter.

Ricardo Fiel explains how a culture of blame leads teams to failure and self destruction

Ricardo tell us a story of a company where he worked where blame was part of their job. He explain us how that culture drove teams to self destroy.

About Ricardo Fiel

Ricardo has 12 years experience in software teams, He had multiple roles from developer to architect to CTO, working in both startups and global corporations. He led teams from 4 to 30 members. Currently, he leads product development (SaaS) teams at Rupeal. You can find Ricardo in linkedin or twitter.

Ricardo Fiel tells us the biggest learning comes from trying out new and not be afraid of failing

Ricardo explains how he failed with one of his previous teams, and how this failure led him to understand that trying out new approaches is a key factor for leaning and improvement.

About Ricardo Fiel

Ricardo has 12 years experience in software teams, He had multiple roles from developer to architect to CTO, working in both startups and global corporations. He led teams from 4 to 30 members. Currently, he leads product development (SaaS) teams at Rupeal. You can find Ricardo in linkedin or twitter.

Dennis Mansell talks how a semi destructive team is even worse than a complete destructive team

Dennis discusses that most of the times when we start to work as a team, we simply put people together expecting that everything will work. We even forget to ask if people do actually want to work together. In this episode he explains how that can go wrong.

About Dennis Mansell

Dennis did not start his working life as a developer, but as a sailing yacht skipper and owner of a sailing school and he still trains yacht-racing teams. He always supplemented his sailing job with application maintenance, web development and project management. He has since settled down: based in Amsterdam with his wife and son. Now he works as a full-time Scrum Master and Agile Coach for companies ranging from start-ups to the Dutch governmental institutions. His linkedin and twitter: @dennmans.

Dennis Mansell tells us how you can be fired for not spending all the project budget

Dennis explains us how most of his learnings came from failures. In his story he explains how he lost a project because he spent only 10% of the total budget. As an outcome, spending just this small part of the budget led Dennis to loose his job.

About Dennis Mansell

Dennis did not start his working life as a developer, but as a sailing yacht skipper and owner of a sailing school and he still trains yacht-racing teams. He always supplemented his sailing job with application maintenance, web development and project management. He has since settled down: based in Amsterdam with his wife and son. Now he works as a full-time Scrum Master and Agile Coach for companies ranging from start-ups to the Dutch governmental institutions. His linkedin and twitter: @dennmans.

Dmytro Orlyk talks how bringing more people to a project usually results in a disaster

Dmytro explains that one of the big reasons for team failures appears when a management put extra people into an ongoing project that is late. He mentions this approach was proven many years ago to not be the right approach, yet many teams suffer from this mistake.

About Dmytro Orlyk

Dmytro have an overall 4 years of experience in PM. His latest project has been shown to the Google company. He is an Agile Expert with a strong knowledge of Scrum, Kanban and XP. Few of the engineers that inspire me are Martin Fowler and Chris MacConnell. He can be found in linkedin.