Mattia Battiston on how #NoEstimates can make teams more predictable

Mattia joined a team that was estimating their work. Invariably the estimates were off. Way off. So Mattia, being a self-proclaimed data geek, started looking at the data. The next project came, and the team estimated the project, while Mattia looked at the data they already had. Guess what was the result? In this episode we talk about the NoEstimates book and also how using data (not estimates) will help your team be more predictable. Luckily Mattia is also writing a book about this, The Team Guide to Metrics for Business Decisions, and here is one of Mattia’s presentation on the topic of Kanban metrics.

About Mattia Battiston

Mattia is a software developer and team leader with a great passion for learning and continuous improvement. He has been interested in everything to do with Agile and helping teams improve since the beginning of his career 10 years ago. Mattia uses Kanban, Lean and Agile to help teams strive to get better.

You can link with Mattia Battiston on LinkedIn and connect with Mattia Battiston on Twitter.

BONUS: Joshua Kerievsky introduces Modern Agile

In this BONUS episode of the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast, we explore the idea of what Agile needs to be to continuously adapt to what we have learned about what works and what does not work in Agile.

Agile is soon 20 years old, the Agile manifesto was published in 2001, and as it says right there in the first phrase: it was about discovering (the active word) new and better ways of developing software.

Nearly twenty years on, Joshua Kerievsky has started writing about what he has learned and started a movement with his article Modern Agile.

He starts by making a point that practices need to evolve. Agile has never been about the specific practices, but rather about the value and principles described in the Agile manifesto. And as practices evolve, some should be changed, and others completely removed or at least replaced. In the #NoEstimates movement, for example, the call is for a completely different way of scheduling/predicting project releases, this is just an example of a practice that is a big contrast to the usual Story Point estimation techniques of the first few years of Agile.

Joshua mentions a concrete example: trunk-based development. An approach to software development that foregoes the idea of needing to have multiple branches, but rather has the code integrated at all times. Something that not all Agilists would even support today.

The 4 principles of Modern Agile

We review the 4 principles of Modern Agile:

– Make people awesome: Where we discuss how the goal of our work is to make people excel at something that matters to them. Either users, customers, programmers, or whoever it is that we are serving. In the context of Agile, this principle means that the practices we use are in the service of those developing the products and services with the Agile approaches we support

– Make safety a prerequisite: While discussing this principle we review books like The Power of Habit and Smarter, Better, Faster. These books inspired Joshua to bring the idea that safety needs to become a habit, and together with the story of Paul O’Neil (CEO of Alcoa), it created the link between safety (physical and psychological) and productivity.

– Experiment and learn rapidly: One of the key ideas of Agile was to bring speed of delivery, satisfying customers early and often, thereby creating a feedback loop that helped teams and organizations learn faster and therefore improving their products/services faster than their competitors. Experimentation is one of the key ideas that Joshua built into Modern Agile.

– Deliver value continuously: from the fake features that prove demand, to constantly delivering something concrete in a short-time frame. Modern Agile is about the value cycle: deliver, validate, learn, rinse and repeat.

We discuss how these principles are linked and why we need all 4 principles to be present.

The Modern Agile community

At ModernAgile.org, the Modern Agile community is active in discussing their lessons learned as well as what new ideas come from applying the principles. All the material on the site is open source and available for you to use.

Listen in to learn about Modern Agile and see how you can apply the ideas that you resonate with. Agile is adapting to the new reality, and so should you.

About Joshua Kerievsky

Joshua is the founder and CEO of Industrial Logic, a pioneering Extreme Programming/Lean consultancy that radically improves the software development capabilities of organizations around the globe.

In the mid-1990s, Joshua was among a small community of “lightweight methods” practitioners experimenting with better ways of developing software. Since then, he’s helped thousands of people across hundreds of organizations learn better ways of making software. Today, he leads an effort to modernize Agile by removing outdated practices and leveraging the best of what the software community and other industries have learned about achieving awesome results.

Joshua is an international speaker and author of the best-selling, Jolt Cola-award-winning book, Refactoring to Patterns, numerous Agile eLearning courses, and popular articles like Anzeneering, Sufficient Design and Stop Using Story Points.

2017 first 6 months Top Episodes, #1: Vasco Duarte discusses #NoEstimates

The #NoEstimates hashtag has been very active on twitter, and many people in the Agile community are pitching in with their thoughts. But what is #NoEstimates about for the author of the first #NoEstimates book? What can we learn from Vasco’s journey that led him to find #NoEstimates? Join us for this active and passionate conversation between Gunther and Vasco.

About Gunther Verheyen

Gunther left consulting in 2013 to partner with Ken Schwaber, Scrum co-creator, at Scrum.org. He represented Ken and Scrum.org in Europe. Gunther left Scrum.org in 2016 to continue his journey of Scrum as an independent Scrum Caretaker. Gunther believes that Scrum – the most applied software development framework – will not only increase the value that software delivers to organizations but is also a way to re-humanise the workplace for people.

Gunther is co-creator to Agility Path and the Nexus framework for Scaled Professional Scrum.

You can link with Gunther Verheyen on LinkedIn and connect with Gunther Verheyen on Twitter.

Peter Gfader on how to go from boring up-front to #NoEstimates and #MobProgramming

#NoEstimates and #MobProgramming are big trends in the Agile community, but how do we get the benefits and quality of those practices? How do we help teams go from heavy up-front planning to quick, and often planning while still helping each other, raising the quality and feeling like they are working in a real team? Listen to this episode to learn how Peter helped a team reach just that kind of flow! 🙂

About Peter Gfader

Peter hates shitty software and tries his best to improve the profession of software development. For this reason, he joined scrum.org. The seek for improvement keeps him getting out of bed every day… and the smell of coffee that reminds him of warm sunny Sundays in a beach cafe with sand between his toes. One day, Peter woke up and realized that software development is not only about code, but also about people: From his teammates till the end user. Some people you just give donuts and some you need to give a little bit more. Peter is on a journey to make everyone happy.

If he is not sitting on a mountain bike or playing the trumpet, you might find him at a local user group to hang out with other geeks.

You can link with Peter Gfader on LinkedIn and connect with Peter Gfader on Twitter.

Vasco Duarte on what #NoEstimates means for Agile

The #NoEstimates hashtag has been very active on twitter, and many people in the Agile community are pitching in with their thoughts. But what is #NoEstimates about for the author of the first #NoEstimates book? What can we learn from Vasco’s journey that led him to find #NoEstimates? Join us for this active and passionate conversation between Gunther and Vasco.

About Gunther Verheyen

Gunther left consulting in 2013 to partner with Ken Schwaber, Scrum co-creator, at Scrum.org. He represented Ken and Scrum.org in Europe. Gunther left Scrum.org in 2016 to continue his journey of Scrum as an independent Scrum Caretaker. Gunther believes that Scrum – the most applied software development framework – will not only increase the value that software delivers to organizations but is also a way to re-humanise the workplace for people.

Gunther is co-creator to Agility Path and the Nexus framework for Scaled Professional Scrum.

You can link with Gunther Verheyen on LinkedIn and connect with Gunther Verheyen on Twitter.

Peter Götz shares patterns of successful change processes

Peter has gone through many change processes in his career, but in this episode he shares one specific process that helped him improve his own approach to change management. He shares some of the patterns implemented back then that are still used today by him in his work.

In this Episode we refer to the #NoEstimates movement and #NoEstimates book as well as the the book Non-Violent Communication by Marshall Rosenberg.

About Peter Götz
Peter is working as a consultant, trainer and coach based in Munich. He started working as a Java software developer in 2001, changed to consulting in 2006 and has been working as software developer, software architect, technical project manager or team lead. He is a Professional Scrum Trainer at scrum.org and supports teams in adopting Scrum since 2008.

You can link with Peter Götz on LinkedIn and connect with Peter Götz on Twitter. And our listeners in Germany can find Peter Götz on Xing.

Natalie Warnert explains how to help a team focus and get things done

In the fast paced dot.com space there’s always many things happening at the same time. Team can get carried away be stuck in the eternal context switching problem. In this episode Natalie explains how she helped a team recover from constant change of focus, how she was able to bring in focus and value thinking to the team.

About Natalie Warnert

As a developer turned Agile coach, Natalie Warnert understands and embraces what it takes to build great products. Natalie focuses teams on embracing Agile values to build the right product and build the product right. Natalie is currently coaching the Cart/Checkout teams for Best Buy Dotcom and recently earned her Master of Arts degree in Organizational Leadership and Strategic Management.
You can link with Natalie Warnert on LinkedIn, connect with Natalie Warnert on Twitter, read her blog at nataliewarnert.com, and visit her project page Women in Agile.

Emilia Breton-Lake on how executive support can help save a failing Scrum adoption

Sometimes we face situations where it feels like the Scrum adoption is failing. Emilia tells us one such story where the stakeholders were not cooperating, where there was confusion and fear of failure. How she, with the help from an executive, reacted is a great way to get back to the basics and help the team overcome the challenges in the transformation.
In this episode we also talk about #NoNumbers, an approach that Emilia uses to help her teams focus on the value to be delivered. The discussion also touches on #NoEstimates, about which you can read more at NoEstimatesBook.com

About Emilia Breton-Lake

Emilia is a natural-born Agile thinker who managed to swim out of the PMI waterfall almost a decade ago. As the head of the PMO at a major non profit she is constantly looking for new ways to build better software and make the world a better place.
She has also been working on 2 major innovations, On going retrospectives, and #NoNumbers where they have eliminated sizing of stories. They still groom and plan, but don’t assign sizes to stories.
Emilia has worked hard to introduce Scrum and Agile to a non-profit that is very resistant to change.
You can link up with Emilia Breton-Lake on LinkedIn. Or follow Emilia Breton-Lake’s articles at the Scrum Alliance website.