Zach Bonaker explains the role of narrative in change management

There are many tools that can help us in a process of change. The book Lean Change Management by Jason Little lists many of those in the context of a real story about change. In this episode Zach describes some of those tools and how to use then in our roles as Scrum Masters. We also mention the book Nonviolent Communication by Rosenberg.

About Zach Bonaker

Zach Bonaker is Benevolent Trouble-Maker from San Diego. He’s an agile coach who specializes in bringing lean thinking to organizations and teams over varying sizes across the country. Zach builds relationships to help transform people, systems, and structures towards safer and faster ways of delivering high quality software. When he isn’t thinking about next-generation agile ideas, Zach can be found enjoying the sunny west coast weather and connecting with people all around the world. Follow Zach Bonaker on Twitter, and connect with Zach Bonaker on Linkedin.

Jiri Sitina on how small steps lead to big changes

Small steps can lead to big changes. As Jiri says, there’s no point in going against the big wall of large steps in change, it is often disappointing and prone to failure. Identifying the pain points and then taking one step at a time can lead to amazing results.
The book Lean Change Management by Jason Little is referred to as a guide to understand effective change management.

About Jiri Sitina

Jiri works at GoodData. He is currently based in Prague and helps GoodData’s engineering teams to work better, cooperate more, keep on improving and enjoy what they are doing.
You can connect with Jiri Sitina on LinkedIn and link with Jiri Sitina on Twitter.

Daniel Hommel on why it matters that teams run experiments

There are many ways to look at success. Daniel chooses to look at it from the learning point of view. He wants to see teams learn, and run experiments. He mentions the book Lean Change Management by Jason Little as an inspiration for the experiment mindset. As Daniel puts it: being fast is good, but being able to change direction quickly is much better.

About Daniel Hommel

Daniel is a ScrumMaster and Agile Coach with a strong background in Software Engineering. His first touch point with Agility was starting to use the Extreme Programming practices in 2007. After some years of working more on the technical side in recent years his interest has shifted to facilitation, coaching, guiding continuous improvement and working with people in general. You can connect with Daniel Hommel on Twitter.