Matthew Heusser on how a Scrum Master can contribute to organizational success beyond the team

A common answer to the success question on the podcast is “when I’m no longer needed”, but that isn’t a great career advancing answer. So we explore what happens after “I’m no longer needed”.

About Matthew Heusser

Matthew Heusser is the co-author of Save our Scrum, co-chair of the enterprise track at Agile2015, And he is also an author at CIO.com. Matt Software is a delivery consultant/writer and Collaborative software geek since before it was cool.
You can find Matthew Heusser on LinkedIn, and connect with Matthew Heusser on Twitter.

Gil Zilberfeld has a method to find out who is willing to change

What do you do when you go into a team that is burn-out by the changes, constant changes of scope, maybe even processes? Gil shares with us his approach to find out who is willing to take the next step, to support the evolution of the team as a whole.

About Gil Zilberfeld

For over 20 years, Gil has developed, tested, managed and designed software products. He’s gone through failures and successes, in different types of projects and companies.
He has trained and coached developers how to write tests for their untestable code. He has worked with testers on complex applications and with very tight deadlines. He’s helped release products that fit customer needs, by testing the waters, and getting their feedback integrated. He has implemented agile, kanban and lean principles and adapted them to fit teams better.
You can link up with Gil Zilberfeld on LinkedIn, or find Gil Zilberfeld on Twitter.
Gil is writing a book on Unit Testing. Check it out.

Claudio Perrone on how change can be made cheap and easy

Change can be made cheap and easy with the right method that develops a culture of continuous improvement in the team and ultimately the organization. Claudio’s method: PopcornFlow is a an approach to help teams get out of the rut of no-improvement. The method consists of 7 steps:

  1. List the problems and observations
  2. Create options by asking questions like: what could we do now to improve?
  3. Define possible experiments in the form of: Action, reason (why?), expectation, duration)
  4. Select and commit to run one of the experiments you listed
  5. Implement and follow-up the execution of the experiment you selected
  6. Review the results once the experiment is completed
  7. Define what your next steps are given what you learned from that experiment
    Understand the gap between expectations and reality, and start the process all over again.
    You can find out more about Claudio’s method at: PopcornFlow.com.

About Claudio Perrone

Claudio is an independent Lean & Agile management consultant, entrepreneur and startup strategist. You may know him for the amazing cartoons he creates for his presentations or, perhaps, for A3 Thinker, a deck of brainstorming cards for Lean Problem Solving. These days he focuses on PopcornFlow, a brand-new continuous evolution method for personal and organisational change.
You can connect with Claudio Perrone on twitter, and see Claudio Perrone on LinkedIn. These days Claudio is focusing on his latest work: PopcornFlow, a method by which you can Learn how to establish a continuous flow of small, traceable, co-created, explicit change experiments. For you, your team, your organization.

Stefano Porro describes the importance of asking why before getting started

We very often jump to the action straight away and without asking why. But is that wise? How can we create a mindset that leads to results if we don’t know why we are working on something? Stefano tells us a story of how he discovered, and changed his work to always start by asking why, or giving the “why” to the teams he works with.

Stefano mentions some of this favourite books about Agile:

About Stefano Porro

Stefano Porro Scrum Master toolbox podcastStefano is from Turin, Italy. He has worked since 2001 in IT projects and he feels lucky because he does what he loves. He learned about Scrum in 2007 when the company where he was working decided to adopt Scrum. For the first two years he was part of a Scrum team, and he was fascinated from the role of the Scrum Master because he always loved to help team’s members. For him, becoming a Scrum Master, was a natural evolution.

You can find Stefano Porro on Twitter, and connect with Stefano Porro on Linkedin.

Stefano would also like you to be in touch with him through gmail (stefano.porro81@gmail.com) or skype (stefano.bowen). mail: stefano.porro81@gmail.com

You can follow Stefano’s blog to know more about his work and his ideas.

Antti Tevanlinna helps break the team anti-pattern: “nothing ever changes here”

“Nothing ever changes here” is a team anti-pattern that sometimes takes over and freezes team behavior. Teams experiencing that anti-pattern will often complain, be discouraged, but will not take action to change their situation. How to help teams like that? Antti tells us a story of a team that was in that situation and what he and his colleagues did to change the situation and save the project.

About Antti Tevanlinna

scrum_master_toolbox_podcast_Andy_Deighton Antti is an agile practitioner, who got started with agile in my own very first Agile project way back in 2004. He’s been through all kinds of roles, from team member, to management, to customer-facing roles.
You can connect with Antti Tevanlinna on twitter, and check Antti Tevanlinna’s blog.

Nicolas Umiastowski measures his success as a scrum master by the behavior changes he observes

Being a change agent is about helping people and teams go through behavior changes. Scrum Masters need to have a very clear idea of what behavior changes they hope to see in the teams and organizations they work with, to be able to measure their success. Nicolas shares his ideas on what are some of the behavior changes that we should be looking out for as Scrum Masters.

About Nicolas Umiastowski

Nicolas is 40 year old. He is a a French agile coach, specialized in Scrum and Kanban with a strong experiences in Digital and web projects.
He likes Design thinking, storyboarding (especially paper prototypes), getting real feedback from real users, and helping the team to reach symbiosis, and to find meaning in what they do. He is absolutely passionate about agility, but aware that depending on the context (as a consultant), agility can be different from one company to another.
You can find Nicolas Umiatowski on twitter, and follow his blog in french: Nicolas Umiatowski in french.