Claudio Perrone defines agility in a very concrete and actionable way

What does it mean to be more Agile? Claudio has a very concrete definition of agility that you can start using today to measure how agile is your team. His definition: the more experiments you run, the more agile you are. After all experiments lead to learning, and learning leads to adaptation. Evolve as quickly as a virus, not as an elephant!

About Claudio Perrone

Claudio is an independent Lean & Agile management consultant, entrepreneur and startup strategist. You may know him for the amazing cartoons he creates for his presentations or, perhaps, for A3 Thinker, a deck of brainstorming cards for Lean Problem Solving. These days he focuses on PopcornFlow, a brand-new continuous evolution method for personal and organisational change.
You can connect with Claudio Perrone on twitter, and see Claudio Perrone on LinkedIn. These days Claudio is focusing on his latest work: PopcornFlow, a method by which you can Learn how to establish a continuous flow of small, traceable, co-created, explicit change experiments. For you, your team, your organization.

Claudio Perrone on two contrasting approaches to recruiting

Sometimes recruiting for what people already know is the right approach. But is that always the right approach? Claudio suggests that sometimes you should rather focus on potential and he explains why.

About Claudio Perrone

Claudio is an independent Lean & Agile management consultant, entrepreneur and startup strategist. You may know him for the amazing cartoons he creates for his presentations or, perhaps, for A3 Thinker, a deck of brainstorming cards for Lean Problem Solving. These days he focuses on PopcornFlow, a brand-new continuous evolution method for personal and organisational change.
You can connect with Claudio Perrone on twitter, and see Claudio Perrone on LinkedIn. These days Claudio is focusing on his latest work: PopcornFlow, a method by which you can Learn how to establish a continuous flow of small, traceable, co-created, explicit change experiments. For you, your team, your organization.

Claudio Perrone on why the daily meetings fail

Daily meetings fail for many reasons, and Claudio has an idea of why it happens regularly. The 3 questions in the Scrum daily just can’t work in all situations. Claudio discusses some ideas on how to improve the questions the team asks in the daily meeting and gives a few tips on how to improve the Scrum board to make work more visible and focus the team on Flow.
We also discuss a promising framework to help teams understand the “why” of every story they develop. This is a framework developed based on the work by Clayton Christensen (Innovator’s Dilemma), and tries to define the content of products from a different perspective: the job to be done that customers hire the product for. Watch Clayton Christensen present the idea of jobs to be done on youtube. Or listen to the Jobs-To-Be-Done radio podcast if you want to know more about this promising framework.

About Claudio Perrone

Claudio is an independent Lean & Agile management consultant, entrepreneur and startup strategist. You may know him for the amazing cartoons he creates for his presentations or, perhaps, for A3 Thinker, a deck of brainstorming cards for Lean Problem Solving. These days he focuses on PopcornFlow, a brand-new continuous evolution method for personal and organisational change.
You can connect with Claudio Perrone on twitter, and see Claudio Perrone on LinkedIn. These days Claudio is focusing on his latest work: PopcornFlow, a method by which you can Learn how to establish a continuous flow of small, traceable, co-created, explicit change experiments. For you, your team, your organization.

Claudio Perrone on how change can be made cheap and easy

Change can be made cheap and easy with the right method that develops a culture of continuous improvement in the team and ultimately the organization. Claudio’s method: PopcornFlow is a an approach to help teams get out of the rut of no-improvement. The method consists of 7 steps:

  1. List the problems and observations
  2. Create options by asking questions like: what could we do now to improve?
  3. Define possible experiments in the form of: Action, reason (why?), expectation, duration)
  4. Select and commit to run one of the experiments you listed
  5. Implement and follow-up the execution of the experiment you selected
  6. Review the results once the experiment is completed
  7. Define what your next steps are given what you learned from that experiment
    Understand the gap between expectations and reality, and start the process all over again.
    You can find out more about Claudio’s method at: PopcornFlow.com.

About Claudio Perrone

Claudio is an independent Lean & Agile management consultant, entrepreneur and startup strategist. You may know him for the amazing cartoons he creates for his presentations or, perhaps, for A3 Thinker, a deck of brainstorming cards for Lean Problem Solving. These days he focuses on PopcornFlow, a brand-new continuous evolution method for personal and organisational change.
You can connect with Claudio Perrone on twitter, and see Claudio Perrone on LinkedIn. These days Claudio is focusing on his latest work: PopcornFlow, a method by which you can Learn how to establish a continuous flow of small, traceable, co-created, explicit change experiments. For you, your team, your organization.

Tim Bourguignon follows the pain to understand how the system works

Follow the pain to understand the system. Look for unexplained trends, then look outside the team for possible explanations. Find out who is actually communicating with whom. Measure everything you can to detect changes, or impacts from others outside the system. Then sit back and see the big picture.

About Tim Bourguignon

Tim likes to describe himself as a full time geek, agile developer and BS hunter. He was born in France, raised as a European child and currently lives in Germany where he juggles with software development and Scrum Mastering. When he’s not in front of a computer, you’ll find him behind a camera, in his running shoes or with his wife & son… of course never in that order!
You can connect with Tim Bourguignon on twitter or visit Tim Bourguignon’s website to see what he is up to.

Tim Bourguignon measures all the things

How do you measure success? You measure all the things! Wait, don’t switch off yet, because Tim has a very good idea on how you can do this.

  1. Always take notes. In meetings, after conversations, all the time.
  2. Measure everything you can. Tasks completed, cycle time, features, interactions, etc.
  3. Get numbers on everything you do as a Scrum Master. How many times did you talk to each team member this week? How many times did you feel lost, or did not know how to go forward?
  4. Look at trends. Only numbers can help you see trends. So measure and stand back to see the big picture.

About Tim Bourguignon

Tim likes to describe himself as a full time geek, agile developer and BS hunter. He was born in France, raised as a European child and currently lives in Germany where he juggles with software development and Scrum Mastering. When he’s not in front of a computer, you’ll find him behind a camera, in his running shoes or with his wife & son… of course never in that order!
You can connect with Tim Bourguignon on twitter or visit Tim Bourguignon’s website to see what he is up to.

Tim Bourguignon has recipe for recruiting

The recipe for recruiting that Tim shares is about understanding motivation and passion, but recognizing that team work cannot be assessed in an interview. Be ware of the lone wolves when interviewing for Scrum team.

About Tim Bourguignon

Tim likes to describe himself as a full time geek, agile developer and BS hunter. He was born in France, raised as a European child and currently lives in Germany where he juggles with software development and Scrum Mastering. When he’s not in front of a computer, you’ll find him behind a camera, in his running shoes or with his wife & son… of course never in that order!
You can connect with Tim Bourguignon on twitter or visit Tim Bourguignon’s website to see what he is up to.

Tim Bourguignon tells the story of the battles a change team goes through

Tim’s story is about a team that is changing an organization. He discusses how believing you can, and wanting to improve the world can sometimes lead you down the wrong road. And he suggests a few rules to take into account if you want to survive the change process as a team.

About Tim Bourguignon

Tim likes to describe himself as a full time geek, agile developer and BS hunter. He was born in France, raised as a European child and currently lives in Germany where he juggles with software development and Scrum Mastering. When he’s not in front of a computer, you’ll find him behind a camera, in his running shoes or with his wife & son… of course never in that order!
You can connect with Tim Bourguignon on twitter or visit Tim Bourguignon’s website to see what he is up to.

Tim Bourguignon on why Scrum’s impact on the organization is huge

Tim has seen Scrum have a gigantic impact on the organization where he worked. This was a traditional, heavily regulated industry, and scrum had a huge impact. This was a transition where Tim learned the power of the political play. A sobering story that hopefully prepares us to understand that aspect of organizational life.

About Tim Bourguignon

Tim likes to describe himself as a full time geek, agile developer and BS hunter. He was born in France, raised as a European child and currently lives in Germany where he juggles with software development and Scrum Mastering. When he’s not in front of a computer, you’ll find him behind a camera, in his running shoes or with his wife & son… of course never in that order!
You can connect with Tim Bourguignon on twitter or visit Tim Bourguignon’s website to see what he is up to.

Jeremy Jarrell on how Scrum is a method to understand how the system behaves

To understand how the system behaves we must “poke” it, and Scrum is just the perfect method for that. Every sprint is an experiment that helps the team and the Scrum Master understand how the system behaves and reacts to the different experiments that we run every sprint. Jeremy has a collection of metrics he follows-up regularly to keep in aware of how the system behaves, and enable him to actual test new approaches every sprint.

About Jeremy Jarrell

Jeremy Jarrell is an agile coach and author who helps teams get better at doing what they love. He is heavily involved in the technology community, both as a highly rated speaker as well as a syndicated author whose articles and videos have appeared on numerous popular websites.
You can connect with Jeremy Jarrell on twitter, and link with Jeremy Jarrell on LinkedIn. Jeremy’s web-site is at www.jeremyjarrell.com.
Jeremy’s latest video course, Agile Release Planning, is available now from FrontRowAgile.com.