Learning on the job is the new Certification!

TL;DR: The Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast sponsors the Remote Forever Summit to help you learn on the job! It’s FREE, grab the opportunity!

When the big Agile adoption wave started in the early 2000’s, certification was all the craze. These days it looks like you can’t have a coffee meeting without getting a certificate. But here’s the thing: a certificate only states that you know the basics! I have (infamously) said, “Please do share that you have a Scrum Master certificate so that I can eliminate you from the hiring process!”

Why did I do that?

Certification does not say you want to learn. Certification does not say you are an insightful Scrum Master or coach. Certification only says: “I know the basics”. And if that’s all people can quote as their achievements it further says: “I don’t want to know more than the basics”.

Go beyond the basics

At the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast, we believe that learning on the job, learning every day is how we get better. How we improve our craft and our profession. Agile coaching or Scrum Mastering is not something that you can learn in a university, you learn it on the job!

As part of our efforts to help you learn on the job we decided to sponsor 2 online summits, which are FREE (no excuses!) for you to learn from amazing speakers.

This week we are sponsoring the Remote Forever Summit which has amazing speakers that share their insights on how to work (specifically) with remote teams.

We hope you like it, and we will continue to support more online summits and even conferences in the future that help Scrum Masters and Agile Coaches learn from people who’ve been applying these ideas and sharing their experiences for many years.

Go learn! Be better, every day!

PS: are you thinking of organizing an online summit? Get in touch, we’d love to help!

Oana Juncu on how dangerous success can be

Sometimes we forget that failure is always around the corner. We get too confident and stop looking at the failure signs. Oana shares just such a story, and what she did to get out of it.

About Oana Juncu

Oana likes to present herself as a Business DJ, mixing whatever practices, from Agile and Lean(Startup) to storytelling , User Experience and neuroscience. In her day to day Oana helps teams and organisations unfold creativity, become proud of their achievements, and delight their customers.
You can connect with Oana Juncu on LinkedIn, or follow Oana Juncu on Twitter.
Oana’s website can be seen at coemerge.com.

Woody Zuill: “The system is where it’s at”

Woody Zuill discusses systems, and tools to help us understand the system. We also discuss how important retrospectives are, and how to go about increasing the amount, and value of your retrospectives: Just-In-Time retrospectives.

About Woody Zuill

Woody Zuill, an independent Agile Consultant, Trainer, Coach, and Guide and has been programming computers for 30+ years. As a pioneer of the Mob Programming approach of teamwork for software development he has been sharing presentations and workshops on Mob Programming for conferences, user groups, and companies all over the world. He is considered one of the founders of the “#NoEstimates” discussion on Twitter.
You can connect with Woody Zuill on LinkedIn or contact Woody Zuill on Twitter.
If you are interested, check the MobProgramming conference.

Woody Zuill discusses failed Agile adoptions

Agile is an approach to software development that asks us to look at the whole process differently. It asks us to consider different values, principles and perspectives that differ significantly from previous approaches. And it is because of that that it causes many to feel like their previous successes no longer matter. In such an environment it is very easy to feel rejected and that our experience does not count. This leads to problems in agile adoption. Woody talks about one such experience and what he learned from it.

About Woody Zuill

Woody Zuill, an independent Agile Consultant, Trainer, Coach, and Guide and has been programming computers for 30+ years. As a pioneer of the Mob Programming approach of teamwork for software development he has been sharing presentations and workshops on Mob Programming for conferences, user groups, and companies all over the world. He is considered one of the founders of the “#NoEstimates” discussion on Twitter.
You can connect with Woody Zuill on LinkedIn or contact Woody Zuill on Twitter.
If you are interested, check the MobProgramming conference.

Angel Medinilla from Project Manager to Agile Coach

We all transition from different roles. Some of us start as developers or testers or other roles and end up working with teams as Scrum Masters. Angel shares his journey from Project Manager to Scrum Master.
We also mention how to tackle the presence of laggards, people who are not ready to adopt agile because of their fears and anxieties about the change.

About Angel Medinilla

Ángel Medinilla (Spain, 1973) has 18+ years working experience in the ICT market. In 2007 he started his own Agile Consulting firm. Today, Proyectalis is considered the leading Agile consulting and coaching company in Spain, and one of the most well-known in Europe and Latin America,
He is a regular speaker at Agile conferences all over the world
He is the author of Agile Management (Springer) and “Agile Kaizen: Continuous Improvement Far Beyond Retrospectives’ (Springer). He also contributed to Beyond Agile: Stories of Agile Transformations, (Modus Cooperandi).
In 2015 he co-founded Improvement21, whose goal is to bring the continuous improvement habit to all kind of organizations in order to create better cultures, teams, processes and products.
You can connect with Angel Medinilla on LinkedIn, and contact Angel Medinilla on Twitter.

Zach Bonaker on the 3 successful outcomes for Scrum Masters

In this episode, Zach Bonaker explains the three outcomes he thinks are critical for Scrum Masters.

About Zach Bonaker

Zach Bonaker is Benevolent Trouble-Maker from San Diego. He’s an agile coach who specializes in bringing lean thinking to organizations and teams over varying sizes across the country. Zach builds relationships to help transform people, systems, and structures towards safer and faster ways of delivering high quality software. When he isn’t thinking about next-generation agile ideas, Zach can be found enjoying the sunny west coast weather and connecting with people all around the world. Follow Zach Bonaker on Twitter, and connect with Zach Bonaker on Linkedin.

Zach Bonaker on Apprenticeship for Scrum Masters

Zach shares his journey as a Scrum Master and how important it is to get a pair in your own journey. Apprenticeship for Scrum Masters is not a new idea, but it is an important part in our toolbox for learning as Scrum Masters.

About Zach Bonaker

Zach Bonaker is Benevolent Trouble-Maker from San Diego. He’s an agile coach who specializes in bringing lean thinking to organizations and teams over varying sizes across the country. Zach builds relationships to help transform people, systems, and structures towards safer and faster ways of delivering high quality software. When he isn’t thinking about next-generation agile ideas, Zach can be found enjoying the sunny west coast weather and connecting with people all around the world. Follow Zach Bonaker on Twitter, and connect with Zach Bonaker on Linkedin.

Alberto Brandolini talks about how important it is to define how your assignment starts

As Scrum Masters we start working with teams and sometimes miss the context of the start for that relationship. Alberto shares with us a story of a failed “insertion point”, where he realized that we must actively understand and shape how our assignments start.

About Alberto Brandolini

Alberto looks at himself as sit at the intersection between the Agile/Lean community and the Domain-Driven Design community. Sometimes, he says, the solution is to write better software, sometimes the solution is to take a big modelling surface and see “the problem” in all its magnificence, sometimes the solution is to have a beer.
You can link up with Alberto Brandolini on LinkedIn, or connect with Alberto Brandolini on Twitter.

Henri Karhatsu on moving towards a Vision

Success for a Scrum Master is defined in many ways. For Henri this means focusing on constant evolution and change. He refers to the Toyota Kata by Rother as a model to follow when working with teams and defining success for you, and the team. He emphasizes how important it is to focus on one improvement goal at a time.

About Henri Karhatsu

Henri is a consultant at his own company Karhatsu IT Consulting in Helsinki, Finland.
He is a very experienced software developer that has worked for and with many clients over his career. He’s also been exploring how to improve our industry of software development and sharing his learnings in his blog.
You can connect with Henri Karhatsu on LinkedIn, and reach out to Henri Karhatsu on Twitter.
Henri Karhatsu’s blog.

Henri Karhatsu on why Scrum Masters need to learn to be patient

A Scrum Master must be able to perform at many levels when working with a team. One of those levels is self-discipline and self-control. In this episode we discuss the need to learn to be patient. Sometimes we are too eager to propose solutions, and then bad things happened because we did not consider the team in our actions. Henri presents two tools that can help you learn to be patient.

About Henri Karhatsu

Henri is a consultant at his own company Karhatsu IT Consulting in Helsinki, Finland.
He is a very experienced software developer that has worked for and with many clients over his career. He’s also been exploring how to improve our industry of software development and sharing his learnings in his blog.
You can connect with Henri Karhatsu on LinkedIn, and reach out to Henri Karhatsu on Twitter.
Henri Karhatsu’s blog.