Victor Bonnacci on leading a multi-team, entereprise change process

There are many factors to take into account in a change process. When many teams are involved this becomes an even more important realization. Victor explains his experience with a large Entreprise change management process.

About Victor Bonnacci

Vic coaches software teams at Bio-Rad Laboratories using Scrum and XP practices. He’s worked in IT for twenty years; first as a webmaster, programmer, project manager and currently as a scrum master and coach. Vic lives in Southern California where he is very active in the local community, and he hosts the Agile Coffee podcast.
You can link with Victor Bonnacci on LinkedIn, and connect with Victor Bonnacci on Twitter.
Be sure to follow Victor Bonnacci’s podcast: Agile Coffee.

Victor Bonnacci explains how each team is different from each other

Although it is tempting to “see” patterns in the teams we work with, the fact is that every team is different. Even the same team is different from project to project, and from day to today. Victor shares his journey from focusing on the process to focus on the team, and how important that is for all Scrum Masters.

About Victor Bonnacci

Vic coaches software teams at Bio-Rad Laboratories using Scrum and XP practices. He’s worked in IT for twenty years; first as a webmaster, programmer, project manager and currently as a scrum master and coach. Vic lives in Southern California where he is very active in the local community, and he hosts the Agile Coffee podcast.
You can link with Victor Bonnacci on LinkedIn, and connect with Victor Bonnacci on Twitter.
Be sure to follow Victor Bonnacci’s podcast: Agile Coffee.

Victor Bonnacci on the importance of letting the team solve their own problems

All of us who have a background in more directive roles (manager, project manager) from our time before Agile, are tempted to take over the problems and solve them for the team. However that’s not how we help teams grow. In this episode Victor shares his story of a recovering Project Manager that needs to learn to help the team solve their own problems.

About Victor Bonnacci

Vic coaches software teams at Bio-Rad Laboratories using Scrum and XP practices. He’s worked in IT for twenty years; first as a webmaster, programmer, project manager and currently as a scrum master and coach. Vic lives in Southern California where he is very active in the local community, and he hosts the Agile Coffee podcast.
You can link with Victor Bonnacci on LinkedIn, and connect with Victor Bonnacci on Twitter.
Be sure to follow Victor Bonnacci’s podcast: Agile Coffee.

Jason Little on being a connector to enable change

One of the tasks we take up as Scrum Masters is to help to change the wider organization. Starting with the teams that our team interacts with. Jason explains how he is able to detect and work with the teams outside that are ready and willing to help change the organization.

About Jason Little

Jason Little helps organizations discover more effective practices for managing work and people. Sometimes that means plucking tools from the Agile world and sometimes that means using more traditional management practices, such as The Rockefeller Habits. Jason is passionate about the people side of change, and focus on bringing meaningful change into organizations that will improve the lives of people. Jason has recently released a new book called Lean Change Management: Innovative Practices for Managing Organizational Change.
You can connect with Jason Little on Twitter and link with Jason Little on Linkedin.
Jason Little is also a funder of Happy Melly.

Jason Little on helping teams work with outside stakeholders

“That’s not Agile!” is a common phrase we hear when a team does not want to compromise their view of agile in order to improve the collaboration with external stakeholders. Although that phrase may be true, we as Scrum Masters must look beyond the surface and understand how to help teams collaborate better with stakeholders.

About Jason Little

Jason Little helps organizations discover more effective practices for managing work and people. Sometimes that means plucking tools from the Agile world and sometimes that means using more traditional management practices, such as The Rockefeller Habits. Jason is passionate about the people side of change, and focus on bringing meaningful change into organizations that will improve the lives of people. Jason has recently released a new book called Lean Change Management: Innovative Practices for Managing Organizational Change.
You can connect with Jason Little on Twitter and link with Jason Little on Linkedin.
Jason Little is also a funder of Happy Melly.

Jason Little shares how hard it is to handle disruptive team members

It is hard enough to help a team that works OK, but handling teams with highly disruptive team members is extremely difficult. There are no formulas, but Jason shares with us some of the tools he used in a particular case where he had to help the team deal with a highly disruptive team member.

About Jason Little

Jason Little helps organizations discover more effective practices for managing work and people. Sometimes that means plucking tools from the Agile world and sometimes that means using more traditional management practices, such as The Rockefeller Habits. Jason is passionate about the people side of change, and focus on bringing meaningful change into organizations that will improve the lives of people. Jason has recently released a new book called Lean Change Management: Innovative Practices for Managing Organizational Change.
You can connect with Jason Little on Twitter and link with Jason Little on Linkedin.
Jason Little is also a funder of Happy Melly.

Woody Zuill discusses failed Agile adoptions

Agile is an approach to software development that asks us to look at the whole process differently. It asks us to consider different values, principles and perspectives that differ significantly from previous approaches. And it is because of that that it causes many to feel like their previous successes no longer matter. In such an environment it is very easy to feel rejected and that our experience does not count. This leads to problems in agile adoption. Woody talks about one such experience and what he learned from it.

About Woody Zuill

Woody Zuill, an independent Agile Consultant, Trainer, Coach, and Guide and has been programming computers for 30+ years. As a pioneer of the Mob Programming approach of teamwork for software development he has been sharing presentations and workshops on Mob Programming for conferences, user groups, and companies all over the world. He is considered one of the founders of the “#NoEstimates” discussion on Twitter.
You can connect with Woody Zuill on LinkedIn or contact Woody Zuill on Twitter.
If you are interested, check the MobProgramming conference.

Angel Diaz-Maroto: from programmer to leader and what he learned in the process

The journey we are in as Scrum Masters has many different forms. Angel tells us the story of his transition from Developer to Leader, and what were the critical lessons he learned in the process. We also mention a critical book for us in the software world: Lean Software Development by Mary and Tom Poppendieck.

About Angel Diaz-Maroto

Angel is a seasoned and very energetic Agile coach and a frequent speaker at international conferences and Agile events in Europe and America. He is Certified Scrum Coach. Currently he is member of Agilar, one of the leading Agile coaching firms in Europe and Latin-America.
He is now at Agilar, but before he was the leader at one of the biggest Agile transformations in europe, including business and IT at the Spanish branch of a multinational bank (ING). He lead the transformation from the trenches and starting from scratch. He as more than 15 years of experience in many different roles and is a professor at ESNE (University School of design, innovation & technology).
You can link up with Angel Diaz-Maroto on LinkedIn and connect with Angel Diaz-Maroto on Twitter.

Amitai Schlair on leading change as a scrum master

Today’s episode is the first where we tackle a new question: how to lead change in our role as a Scrum Master. Change management or change leadership is one of the core skills for us as Scrum Masters, and Amitai shares with us some of the tools he uses to help teams and organizations go through the change process. He also shares with us one approach he uses to develop trust between him and the teams he works with.
Today we play one more Agile in 3 Minutes episode that talks about what it means to be wrong and why that matters. Today’s Agile in 3 minutes episode is episode #5, titled “Wrong”.

About Amitai Schlair

Amitai is a Software development coach, and legacy code wrestler, non-award-winning musician, award-winning bad poet, and creator of Agile in 3 Minutes, which is a great podcast about what Agile really is about. A must listen for anyone interested in Agile Software Development.
You can link with Amitai Schlair on LinkedIn and connect with Amitai Schlair on Twitter.

Sean Dunn talks about the “structures that are in place”

Sean describes talks about models, structural and organizational models that help us understand the system that affects our organizations.
Sean talks about his own model:

  1. Transformational Leadership
  2. Lean Product Development
  3. Technical Excellence (PDF)

It is critical that we build a model that allows us to think about the whole organization. And use questions to investigate the system. As Sean put it “questions communicate value”.

About About Sean Dunn

Sean is an Enterprise Agile Coach with IHS Global. He has been involved with agile development for 8 years as a developer, product owner, and agile coach. Prior to his exposure to agile development Sean spent 13 years in the Canadian Army. In fact, Sean is known to point out that the Army is far more agile than most people think.
That background in the Canadian Army influenced his view of Leadership and the role of Leadership in creating and developing great teams.
You can connect with Sean Dunn on LinkedIn, check out Sean Dunn on the Scrum Alliance or email him at sean.dunn@ihs.com.
Check out Sean Dunn’s blog on leadership.