Jon Eversett talks the long term cultural effects of a Waterfall to Agile transition

A Waterfall to Agile transition is never easy, but there are many problems that appear simple at first, until we see their impact on the organization. One such problem is the existence of skill silos in the Waterfall (matrix organization) world. These silos are often re­inforced by organizational structures that are hard or impossible to break, even after adopting agile. Their impact on the teams is something that Scrum Masters need to be aware of.

About Jon Eversett

scrum_master_toolbox_podcast_Andy_Deighton Former Business Analyst, Product Owner wannabe, currently a Scrum Master. Jon works with teams with different maturity levels and some relatively new Product Owners. You can find Jon Eversett on LinkedIn, or interact with Jon Eversett on Twitter. You can read Jon Eversett’s blog to find out more about his ideas on the role of the scrum master and all things agile.

Neil Killick on information radiators, Little’s Law and Queuing Theory

Little’s Law is a relatively recent discovery in Queuing Theory. It was only proven in 1961, and still unknown to many in the software industry today.
Neil discusses why that simple theorem is so important in software projects, and how it can help you understand why over-commitment is so common, and bad for software development.

About Neil Killick

scrum_master_toolbox_podcast_Andy_Deighton Neil has been a software professional for over 18 years, mostly as a developer, before moving to management. He spent the last 5 years being a passionate Agile, Lean and Scrum coach, trainer and practitioner. Neil cares deeply about creating enjoyable, authentic workplaces in which human potential can thrive.
You can connect with Neil Killick on twitter. Neil Killick’s blog.

Neil Killick how important it is to ask questions and how easy it is to forget that

We don’t ask questions often enough, and in this episode Neil explains why that is so important. Neil tells us a story of a project that started well, continued well, everything seemed to work well, until…
He discusses how one small detail derailed the whole project, and how to avoid that in the future.

About Neil Killick

scrum_master_toolbox_podcast_Andy_Deighton Neil has been a software professional for over 18 years, mostly as a developer, before moving to management. He spent the last 5 years being a passionate Agile, Lean and Scrum coach, trainer and practitioner. Neil cares deeply about creating enjoyable, authentic workplaces in which human potential can thrive.
You can connect with Neil Killick on twitter. Neil Killick’s blog.

Jeff Kosciejew tells us how using Scrum in a Bank helped him change the culture and deliver amazing experiences

If you thought that Jeff Kosciejew learned about being a great Scrum Master from his software industry experience you’d be wrong. Jeff learned a lot about being a servant leader, and a champion for a high-performance culture in his days as a Bank Manager. He shares his story of how his Scrum-like principles and values helped him create a superior Bank experience for his customers. He details how he was able to build a self-organizing team in his Bank branch and how he learned to be a servant leader. It’s all about people, people! 🙂

About Jeff Kosciejew

scrum_master_toolbox_podcast_jeff_kosciejewJeff is a consummate generalist, with experience in a wide variety of industries in a wide variety of roles. Throughout all of his experience, Jeff has had enjoyed success through a single focus on enabling and empowering those he works with, even before being introduced to Agile and Scrum.
You can find Jeff Kosciejew on twitter, and reach Jeff on LinkedIn.

Peter Hilton describes one of the self-destructive habits of Scrum teams

The team’s self-destructive habit

Being a slave to the backlog, and just going through the motions without interacting with the other team members or stakeholders. This is further amplified in Death-march like projects.

About Peter Hilton

Peter_Hilton_Scrum_Master_Toolbox_podcastPeter is a software developer and technical project manager who has experienced every point on the agility spectrum, in the course of 18 years of development projects. Peter has performed several variations of the Scrum Master role, and learned what the books dont tell you: whats easy and whats hard.
You can reach Peter Hilton on twitter and read his blog at Hilton.org.uk.