Mark Thuun on how transparency can help organizations change

Teams, and Scrum Masters often want to “hide” the problems they face by fear of upsetting the stakeholders. But is that really how you foster change? In this episode we listen to a story where showing the problem to all involved helped create the necessary change.

About Mark Thuun

Mark started as a software developer when he learned some basic PASCAL from his dad taught. He was then 7-8 years old. Mark has been working as a Scrum Master since january 2015. For 2 years he worked with teams in the biggest telco in Denmark, and currently works for the danish national lottery.

You can link with Mark Thuun on LinkedIn

Mark Thuun on the failure to evolve as an anti-pattern

Teams can adopt new ideas, and learn how to improve. Or they can get stuck in the cycle of trying and quitting, but not learning. Which is the pattern in your team? Looking for the patterns of learning in our teams – and detecting the lack of learning – is a great way to prevent teams from committing performance suicide.

About Mark Thuun

Mark started as a software developer when he learned some basic PASCAL from his dad taught. He was then 7-8 years old. Mark has been working as a Scrum Master since january 2015. For 2 years he worked with teams in the biggest telco in Denmark, and currently works for the danish national lottery.

You can link with Mark Thuun on LinkedIn

Mark Thuun shares his tips on dealing with distributed teams

Distributed teams are hard to work with, but if you add cultural differences to the mix things get complicated pretty quickly. In this episode we hear a story of a team that was scattered, and a Scrum Master that did not know about the nuances of the team’s national culture. Listen it to learn what happened and how to avoid it from happening to you.

About Mark Thuun

Mark started as a software developer when he learned some basic PASCAL from his dad taught. He was then 7-8 years old. Mark has been working as a Scrum Master since january 2015. For 2 years he worked with teams in the biggest telco in Denmark, and currently works for the danish national lottery.

You can link with Mark Thuun on LinkedIn

BONUS: Diana Larsen and James Shore introduce the Agile Fluency Model™ for Scrum Masters

In this Bonus episode we have Diana Larsen, and James Shore, both authors of acclaimed books about Agile. They join us to talk about their model called Agile Fluency Model™. We talk about how the model emerged.

One of the premises of the model is that teams find proficiency in different aspects of their work. Some teams focus on Value delivery, others focus on improving their technical skills, etc. And although all of these approaches are valuable, they are also different. And we need to understand where we are, as well as what phase best corresponds to the needs of the teams and organizations we work with.

The different phases of team fluency are called “zones”, as in a Bus route. This is because all zones are possible destinations, but there is a certain sequence to the progression. Diana and James discovered this after a long process of learning and experimenting with the teams they’ve worked with. The model reflects their experience, and has been validated by many other Agile Coaches that have seen similar patterns of development for their teams. The Agile Fluency Model is a collection of patterns that teams experience over time, and given their specific focus.

The model is also a useful tool for our retrospectives in the form of a “diagnostics” tool that the core team has put together to help us understand where each of our team is according to the model.

Many will no doubt tempted to call the Agile Fluency Model a “maturity model”, but Diana and James point out that each of the phases of the model has its own maturity dimension, and a team can be very mature in any of the phases if that suits their business context. Maturity is a cross-cutting concern for all phases of the model.

There’s also a very cool story of how the model was invented. Interested? Then listen in on our conversation about the Agile Fluency Model.

When you are ready to know more, follow the links below:

About the authors

Diana Larsen joins us today from Portland, Oregon. Diana leads the practice area for Agile software development, team leadership, and Agile evolutions at FutureWorks Consulting. Diana is co-author of Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great; Liftoff: Start and Sustain Successful Agile Teams; Five Rules for Accelerated Learning; and co-originator of the Agile Fluency™ model.

You can link with Diana Larsen on LinkedIn and connect with Diana Larsen on Twitter.

James Shore joins us today from Portland, Oregon. James is a long-time Agile practitioner who teaches, writes, and consults on Agile development processes. He is a recipient of the Agile Alliance’s Gordon Pask Award for Contributions to Agile Practice, co-author of /The Art of Agile Development/, and co-creator of the Agile Fluency Model. InfoQ has named him as one of the “most influential people in Agile.” You can find his screencasts at letscodejavascript.com and essays at jamesshore.com.

You can link with James Shore on LinkedIn and connect with James Shore on Twitter.

Christian Delez on what questions to ask when trying to understand the system

What do you use to evaluate your understanding of the system where you are? Christian suggest that some questions can help us go a long way towards understanding the system where we work. In this episode we refer to the Happy Melly community, where many other people like us try to understand how to create happier systems of work!

About Christian Delez

Christian is passionate about team dynamics and culture design. Christian loves trying new human interactions patterns to bring happiness for each individual in a team. Christian works as an agile project leader and coach. He also volunteers in www.GreatnessGuild.org and www.tealcamp.ch.

You can link with Christian Delez on LinkedIn and connect with Christian Delez on Twitter.

Christian Delez and the 3 aspects of Scrum Master success

What aspects do you consider when evaluating your success as a scrum master? In this episode we review the 3 aspects that Christian uses to evaluate the impact of his work. And for each of those 3 aspects we discuss possible metrics for us to use.

About Christian Delez

Christian is passionate about team dynamics and culture design. Christian loves trying new human interactions patterns to bring happiness for each individual in a team. Christian works as an agile project leader and coach. He also volunteers in www.GreatnessGuild.org and www.tealcamp.ch.

You can link with Christian Delez on LinkedIn and connect with Christian Delez on Twitter.

Christian Delez on how you organize for change to take effect

Change resistance is a big topic in the change management community. So big in fact that many say it should be the focus of our work. But should it? How do you organize so that change becomes a normal aspect of daily work life? Christian shares the ideas they are trying out at his workplace, and how that could be useful for you in your efforts to help change take hold.

About Christian Delez

Christian is passionate about team dynamics and culture design. Christian loves trying new human interactions patterns to bring happiness for each individual in a team. Christian works as an agile project leader and coach. He also volunteers in www.GreatnessGuild.org and www.tealcamp.ch.

You can link with Christian Delez on LinkedIn and connect with Christian Delez on Twitter.

Christian Delez on why it is so crucial to learn to communicate as a team

What have you done lately to help your team communicate better? Lack of communication, or even ineffective communication can cause problems. Serious problems. In this episode we talk about how communication can be improved, and what happens when it doesn’t.

In this episode we refer to the concept of Obeya, the large project room where the team can communicate and create the community aspect of a project.

About Christian Delez

Christian is passionate about team dynamics and culture design. Christian loves trying new human interactions patterns to bring happiness for each individual in a team. Christian works as an agile project leader and coach. He also volunteers in www.GreatnessGuild.org and www.tealcamp.ch.

You can link with Christian Delez on LinkedIn and connect with Christian Delez on Twitter.

Christian Delez shares a story of a Definition of Done that did not work

The Definition of Done, or DoD, is an original part of Scrum. And it is there to help teams focus on the things that matter to deliver their work at an acceptable level of completion, aka “Done, Done”. But itself does not make miracles happen. There’s a lot of work in making a DoD stick, and Christian relates one of those stories in this episode.

About Christian Delez

Christian is passionate about team dynamics and culture design. Christian loves trying new human interactions patterns to bring happiness for each individual in a team. Christian works as an agile project leader and coach. He also volunteers in www.GreatnessGuild.org and www.tealcamp.ch.

You can link with Christian Delez on LinkedIn and connect with Christian Delez on Twitter.

Carolina Gorosito shares her own map to navigate complex systems

Mapping is a tool we don’t talk about enough. Mapping includes visualization, affinity grouping, analysis and synthesis all in one tool. We don’t talk about enough this tool that can literally help you map your way to success. In this episode we talk about different types of mapping approaches that can (literally) help us navigate the system we work within.

About Carolina Gorosito

Carolina is a natural connector and team enabler, great at finding people’s strengths and helping them combine their skills to become hi performers in the organisations and obtain better results every day.

You can connect with her via her personal blog: carolinagorosito.com.

You can link with Carolina Gorosito on LinkedIn and connect with Carolina Gorosito on Twitter.